Friday, February 26, 2010

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

FYI from Leigh at Lunch 2-24-10

If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 2/24/10, "Leigh for Lunch with Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Jr." (Click on the title to listen to the show archive now).

Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, March 3, at 12 noon EST to join the conversation about Classical Conversations' events and services. Upcoming speakers on BlogTalk include Ravi Zacharias.

  • Ongoing events
  • Click here to register for the Stanford test through CC. Purchase test prep books from the CC Bookstore.
  • Leigh's newest book, The Core, will be released this spring! Pre-order it on Amazon.
  • Find out more about CC's summer student camps and *free* Parent Practicums on the CC website. Register today!

  • Notes from today's show
  • Find out more about Patrick Henry College via their website. You can read Dr. Veith's blog, Cranach, at www.geneveith.com.
  • Classical Education, Dr. Veith's first book on the movement (with Andrew Kern), is available from the CiRCE Institute and on Amazon.
  • For an example of Christianity in the arts, check out examples of innovative poetry by George Herbert and G.M. Hopkins, as well as T.S. Eliot; the art of Rembrandt; and the music of Bach.
  • For a brief overview of the poetry featured in the Old Testament, see this article.
  • You can find You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier from Amazon, or see the review on Dr. Veith's blog.
  • God at Work is a book by Dr. Veith about the question of vocation. Its ideas are explored further by the Cranach Institute.
  • See Dr. Veith's review of Wittenberg, the play. The resulting conversation with the playwright is available here.
  • Dr. Veith is an occasional contributor to World Magazine and Tabletalk Magazine are available online.
  • The top 3 classic films Dr. Veith recommends are: Citizen Kane, Casablanca, and The Seventh Seal.
  • Monday, February 22, 2010

    Gene Veith on Leigh at Lunch

    It's back!! Join me Wednesdays at 12 noon EST for my Blog Talk Radio show, Leigh at Lunch.

    Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Jr.This Wednesday, Feb. 24 at noon, I'll be talking to Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Jr.

    Dr. Veith is an Alliance Council member and Provost and Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, a Christian classical liberal arts college in Purcellville, VA.

    Prior to coming to Patrick Henry College as Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Veith served as the Culture Editor of World Magazine and Executive Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

    Dr. Veith was on the faculty for 19 years as Professor of English at Concordia University-Wisconsin, where he also served for six years as the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. He has also taught at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College and has been a visiting professor at the Estonian Institute of Humanities, Gordon-Conwell, Regent College (Vancouver), and Wheaton College.

    In addition, he serves as the director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He has also been a Fellow at the Capital Research Center and Heritage Foundation.

    Dr. Veith is well-known in Christian conservative circles through his writing and speaking on various aspects of Christianity and culture. He is a columnist for Table Talk magazine. He also operates the Cranach blog (geneveith.com) featuring regular commentary on Christianity and Culture.

    His writings number more than 100 scholarly articles, reviews, papers, and books including Postmodern Times: A Christian Guide to Contemporary Thought and Culture; God at Work: Your Christian Vocation in All of Life; A Place to Stand: The Word of God in the Life of Martin Luther; and Spirituality of the Cross: The Way of the First Evangelicals.

    To listen live, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/1smartmama or click here to go directly to the show. An archive of the show will be available approximately 20 minutes after the show ends.

    Friday, February 19, 2010

    Wednesday, February 17, 2010

    FYI from Leigh at Lunch 2-17-10

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 2/17/10, "Leigh for Lunch with Ray Moore, Jr." (Click on the title to listen to the show archive now).

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, Feb. 24, at 12 noon EST to join the conversation with Leigh and Dr. Gene Edward Veith. Other upcoming speakers include Ravi Zacharias.

  • Ongoing events
  • Testing season is upon us! Click here to register for the Stanford test through CC. To purchase a test prep book, visit the CC Bookstore.
  • Leigh's newest book, The Core, will be released this spring! Look for it in June, or pre-order it on Amazon. Help us spread the word!
  • Use AcademicRecords.net to keep your home school records in order! Use the site for free until you are ready to print; then pay a $15 fee for 12 months and print as many transcripts as you need during that period.

  • Notes from today's show
  • To purchase your own copy of Transcripts Made Easy by Janice Campbell, find it through the CC Bookstore.
  • To find out more about the Exodus Mandate Project, visit their website. The video "Call to Dunkirk" is available on the site. Also see the video of Mr. Moore's 2009 debate with Dr. Herb Silverman of the Secular Coalition for America.
  • Chaplain Moore cites Matt. 18 and 19, Eph. 6, Deut. 6, and Psalm 78 as examples of Scriptures that support Christian education.
  • For studies on the results of home schooling, see National Home Education Research Institute.
  • To find information about alternate private Christian school systems, visit the National Association of University-Model Schools.
  • Chaplain Moore cites Dr. Al Mohler and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary as representatives friendly to home schooling.
  • Visit the Foundation for American Christian Education at face.net.
  • Patrick Henry, Bob Jones, Liberty, Regent, Covenant, Cedarville, and Grove City are among Chaplain Moore's recommendations for Christian higher ed. Visit the Intercollegiate Scholastic Institute for more ideas.
  • Read more about the Robert Dreyfus Courageous Christian Leadership Award, which recognizes outstanding leadership by today's Christians.
  • Tuesday, February 16, 2010

    Leigh's Thesis: A Look Back


    A LOOK BACK

    Dear readers,

    Wow! It's hard to believe it's been 10 months since I started posting this "summer" idea exchange. An index of the entire archive is now available here. Thanks for reading along with me on my journey through the theological foundations of Classical Conversations and home-centered, church-based education.

    If you have suggestions for a new idea exchange, I would love to hear them! In the meantime, I'm getting excited for the release of my new book, The Core: Teaching Your Child the Foundations of Classical Education, and other upcoming events this spring.

    I hope you'll join me on Blog Talk Radio and in person as I travel around the country for parent practicums and equipping events. Until then, keep up the good--challenging--work of discipling your children and re-training your brain!

    Remember: You're one smart mama (or dad), and you can teach your children the tools to learn anything. You can do it!

    Love,

    Leigh



    Monday, February 15, 2010

    Ray Moore on Leigh at Lunch

    It's back!! Join me Wednesdays at 12 noon EST for my Blog Talk Radio show, Leigh at Lunch.

    E. Ray Moore, Jr.This Wednesday, Feb. 17 at noon, I'll be talking to E. Ray Moore Jr.

    Mr. Moore--Bible teacher, Army Reserve Chaplain (Ret.), and campaign consultant--has served twenty-eight years in pastoral ministry as a campus pastor, pastor-teacher in the local church or as an Army Chaplain.

    He has served as a speaker-lecturer in a university setting on public policy, church-state and theological subjects. He has worked as a campus pastor at both the University of South Carolina and Purdue University.

    He and his wife, Gail, were selected as SC Parents of the Year for 2000 by Parents' Day Council, Washington, DC. They have four children and three grandchildren. They were home-schoolers from 1977-1994. They have had a long-term involvement in private Christian Education.

    Mr. Moore serves as President of Frontline Ministries; a Columbia, SC-based ministry, which focuses on prayer, revival and evangelism. Frontline Ministries also provides a chaplaincy service for small businesses, corporations, and institutions. Mr. Moore is also the director of the Exodus Mandate Project.

    To listen live, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/1smartmama or click here to go directly to the show. An archive of the show will be available approximately 20 minutes after the show ends.

    Friday, February 12, 2010

    Thursday, February 11, 2010

    Let Me Remember

    It's winter. It's cold outside. A month after New Year's, maybe your resolution to exercise is losing its savor.

    A few weeks ago, The Washington Post ran a story called "The old-school way of memorizing diners' orders is fried," in which they suggest that another type of exercise is on a much larger downward slide.

    The article introduces a 20-year veteran waiter in Washington, D.C. who still does everything from daily specials to orders to payment--from memory. No order pad. No pen and paper.

    I wasn't too surprised to find that waiters like this man are becoming more and more scarce.
    As Washington's annual Restaurant Week brings waves of new diners into local eateries, the venerable waiter memory act is in serious decline, a result of increasingly complicated orders -- customers who customize because of nutrition concerns or allergies real or imagined -- people going out in larger groups, and a generation that seems less comfortable with memorization.
    Although the article emphasizes that Americans are asking for more personalized meals, making waiters' jobs more difficult, he also says servers' ability to memorize is not as good as it once was.
    Several recent studies -- including one published last year in the journal Behavioral Neurology that tested the memories of veteran cafe waiters in Buenos Aires -- found that the servers' constant practice actually expands the brain's memory function.
    One professional waiter says younger servers are much less capable of going without a pen and paper than their older counterparts, despite their supposedly sharper brains.

    Even if waiting tables is not a job you--or your children--plan to tackle any time soon, these facts are disconcerting, don't you think?

    The ability to memorize, like any other muscle skill (remember, the brain is a muscle!), requires practice. Whether you're studying multiplication tables, spelling words, or Latin declensions, you're teaching your brain how to input and store information effectively.

    If you've ever tried to get in shape physically after an extended period of inaction, you know how difficult it is to restore lost muscle tone.

    And those of you who are studying diligently to retrain your brains after years of neglect know it is equally difficult to reclaim lost muscle tone in the brain.

    What is even more significant, if we shrug off memorization in favor of easier options, we're selling our, and our children's, capabilities short.

    So let's renew our efforts to reverse this trend. Join us here at Classical Conversations as we use memory work to train our brains today, keeping them quick and sharp for whatever advanced tasks we may want them to perform tomorrow.

    Remember, you can do it, and so can your children.

    Leave a comment to let other readers know what your favorite "exercise" is this week!

    Wednesday, February 10, 2010

    FYI from Leigh at Lunch 2-10-10

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 2/10/10, "Leigh for Lunch with James B. Jordan" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive now).

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, Feb. 17, at 12 noon EST to join the conversation with Leigh and Ray Moore, Jr. Other upcoming speakers include Ravi Zacharias and Dr. Gene Edward Veith (see his book Reading Between the Lines).

  • Ongoing events
  • Testing season is upon us! Click here to register for the Stanford test through Classical Conversations. To purchase a test prep book for your students, visit the CC Bookstore.
  • Leigh's newest book, The Core: Teaching Your Child the Foundations of a Classical Education, will be released this spring! Look for it from Palgrave-Macmillan in June. (Pre-order it on Amazon.) Help us spread the word!

  • Notes from today's show
  • To purchase your own copy of Peter Leithart's A House for My Name, visit the CC Bookstore.
  • For more about Biblical Horizons ministries, visit their website.
  • James B. Jordan's book Through New Eyes: Developing a Biblical View of the World, is available from Amazon, or find it through the publisher, Wipf and Stock.
  • Visit the Biblical Horizons blog to learn more about upcoming events, including the 2010 Biblical Horizons Bible Conference, which will take place the penultimate week in July.
  • Tuesday, February 9, 2010

    Leigh's Thesis: Appendix 1 (19)


    APPENDIX 1: "The Lost Tools of Learning" (part 19 - final)

    Before concluding these necessarily very sketchy suggestions, I ought to say why I think it necessary, in these days, to go back to a discipline which we had discarded. The truth is that for the last three hundred years or so we have been living upon our educational capital.

    The post-Renaissance world, bewildered and excited by the profusion of new “subjects” offered to it, broke away from the old discipline (which had, indeed, become sadly dull and stereotyped in its practical application) and imagined that henceforward it could, as it were, disport itself happily in its new and extended Quadrivium without passing through the Trivium. But the Scholastic tradition, though broken and maimed, still lingered in the public schools and universities: Milton, however much he protested against it, was formed by it—the debate of the Fallen Angels and the disputation of Abdiel with Satan have the tool-marks of the Schools upon them, and might, incidentally, profitably figure as set passages for our Dialectical studies.

    Right down to the nineteenth century, our public affairs were mostly managed, and our books and journals were for the most part written, by people brought up in homes, and trained in places, where that tradition was still alive in the memory and almost in the blood. Just so, many people today who are atheist or agnostic in religion, are governed in their conduct by a code of Christian ethics which is so rooted that it never occurs to them to question it.

    But one cannot live on capital forever. However firmly a tradition is rooted, if it is never watered, though it dies hard, yet in the end it dies. And today a great number—perhaps the majority—of the men and women who handle our affairs, write our books and our newspapers, carry out our research, present our plays and our films, speak from our platforms and pulpits—yes, and who educate our young people—have never, even in a lingering traditional memory, undergone the Scholastic discipline.

    Less and less do the children who come to be educated bring any of that tradition with them. We have lost the tools of learning--the axe and the wedge, the hammer and the saw, the chisel and the plane—that were so adaptable to all tasks. Instead of them, we have merely a set of complicated jigs, each of which will do but one task and no more, and in using which eye and hand receive no training, so that no man ever sees the work as a whole or “looks to the end of the work.”

    What use is it to pile task on task and prolong the days of labor, if at the close the chief object is left unattained? It is not the fault of the teachers—they work only too hard already. The combined folly of a civilization that has forgotten its own roots is forcing them to shore up the tottering weight of an educational structure that is built upon sand. They are doing for their pupils the work which the pupils themselves ought to do. For the sole true end of education is simply this: to teach men how to learn for themselves; and whatever instruction fails to do this is effort spent in vain.


    Source: Dorothy L. Sayers, "The Lost Tools of Learning," Lecture. Oxford, 1947.

    Copyright © 2009 by Leigh A. Bortins. All Rights Reserved.

    <-- Previous Section // Next Section -->

    Monday, February 8, 2010

    James B. Jordan on Leigh at Lunch

    It's back!! Join me Wednesdays at 12 noon EST for my Blog Talk Radio show, Leigh at Lunch.

    James B. JordanThis Wednesday, Feb. 10 at noon, I'll be talking to James B. Jordan.

    James B. Jordan (born 1949) is a theologian and author. He is director of Biblical Horizons ministries, a think tank in Niceville, Florida that publishes books, essays and other media dealing with Bible commentary, Biblical Theology, and liturgy.

    From 1980 to 1990 Jordan was an associate pastor of a Presbyterian church in Tyler, Texas with Ray Sutton, now a bishop in the Reformed Episcopal Church where he also served in Geneva Ministries.

    To listen live, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/1smartmama or click here to go directly to the show. Call in to share your comments or questions at (347) 215-6509. An archive of the show will be available approximately 20 minutes after the show ends.

    Friday, February 5, 2010

    Wednesday, February 3, 2010

    FYI from Leigh at Lunch 2-3-10

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 2/3/10, "Leigh for Lunch with Andrew Kern" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive now).

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, Feb. 10, at 12 noon EST to join the conversation with Leigh and James B. Jordan of the think tank Biblical Horizons. Other upcoming speakers include Dr. Gene Edward Veith (see his book Reading Between the Lines) and Ravi Zacharias.

  • Ongoing events
  • Testing season is upon us! Click here to register for the Stanford test through Classical Conversations. To purchase a test prep book for your students, visit the CC Bookstore.
  • Leigh's newest book, The Core: Teaching Your Child the Foundations of a Classical Education, will be released this spring! Look for it from Palgrave-Macmillan in June. (Pre-order it on Amazon.) Help us spread the word!

  • Notes from today's show
  • To find out more about thes CiRCE Institute (the Center for Independent Research in Classical Education), visit their website. Andrew's upcoming speaking events are available on the News & Updates page. Or, visit the Institute's blog, Quiddity.
  • The 2010 CiRCE conference will be July 14-17 in Dallas, Texas. The subject is A Contemplation of Liberty. Leigh will be among the speakers this year. Register now for a discounted price and to reserve your space! Group discounts available... Recordings of previous conferences are available from the CiRCE Store.
  • Subscribe to Touchstone Magazine for commentary on Christianity, freedom, family.
  • Andrew's reading suggestions on freedom: the text of the Magna Carta, The Magna Charta (Landmark Books), the 1688 Bill of Rights in Britain, Kirk's The Roots of American Order, and the U.S. Constitution.
  • On the classical model, check out: Norms and Nobility by Hicks, Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning by Wilson, Wisdom and Eloquence by Littlejohn and Evans, and Reforming Education by Adler.
  • Tuesday, February 2, 2010

    Leigh's Thesis: Appendix 1 (18)


    APPENDIX 1: "The Lost Tools of Learning" (part 18)

    Is the Trivium, then, a sufficient education for life? Properly taught, I believe that it should be. At the end of the Dialectic, the children will probably seem to be far behind their coevals brought up on old-fashioned “modern” methods, so far as detailed knowledge of specific subjects is concerned. But after the age of 14 they should be able to overhaul the others hand over fist.

    Indeed, I am not at all sure that a pupil thoroughly proficient in the Trivium would not be fit to proceed immediately to the university at the age of 16, thus proving himself the equal of his mediaeval counterpart, whose precocity astonished us at the beginning of this discussion. This, to be sure, would make hay of the English public-school system, and disconcert the universities very much. It would, for example, make quite a different thing of the Oxford and Cambridge boat race.

    But I am not here to consider the feelings of academic bodies: I am concerned only with the proper training of the mind to encounter and deal with the formidable mass of undigested problems presented to it by the modern world. For the tools of learning are the same, in any and every subject; and the person who knows how to use them will, at any age, get the mastery of a new subject in half the time and with a quarter of the effort expended by the person who has not the tools at his command.

    To learn six subjects without remembering how they were learnt does nothing to ease the approach to a seventh; to have learnt and remembered the art of learning makes the approach to every subject an open door.


    Source: Dorothy L. Sayers, "The Lost Tools of Learning," Lecture. Oxford, 1947.

    Copyright © 2009 by Leigh A. Bortins. All Rights Reserved.

    Monday, February 1, 2010

    Andrew Kern on Leigh at Lunch

    It's back!! Join me Wednesdays at 12 noon EST for my Blog Talk Radio show, Leigh at Lunch.

    Andrew KernThis Wednesday, Feb. 3 at noon, I'll be talking to Andrew Kern.

    Andrew Kern is president and founder of the CiRCE Institute. He graduated from Concordia University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he was mentored by Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Jr.

    Dr. Veith and Andrew co-authored the best-selling Classical Education, The Movement Sweeping America, now in its second edition.

    Andrew has been directly involved in establishing three classical Christian schools, training instructors in over 50 schools, and consulting start-up classical schools on institutional development. Andrew has been directing the CiRCE Institute full time since the summer of 2000.

    To listen live, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/1smartmama or click here to go directly to the show. An archive of the show will be available approximately 20 minutes after the show ends.