Friday, April 29, 2011

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

FYI from Leigh! at Lunch 4/27/11

If you're interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 4/27/11, "Thomas Woods on Leigh at Lunch" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive).

Had a question for today's show you didn't get to ask? Email 1smartmama@gmail.com or comment on this post for an answer!

Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, May 4, at 12 noon EST to talk with Leigh and Stanley Fish, a professor of humanities and law at Florida International University, and a prominent writer and New York Times commentator.

  • Ongoing events

  • Join us THIS WEEKEND for "Toward the Quadrivium," with Leigh Bortins and Nancy Pearcey, about science and teaching the quadrivium: April 29-30 in Manassas, Virginia. Tomorrow is the last day for the lower-price early registration.
  • Register now for our 1-day and 3-day summer Parent Practicums and Student Camps!
  • Register as a friend on BlogTalkRadio to be eligible for our weekly drawing! Click "follow" so you'll get updates about spontaneous and pre-recorded shows.
  • Send questions to Leigh for her next book on the dialectic via AskLeigh@ymail.com.
  • Email us at TellUs@classicalconversations.com to let us know what topics you'd like to see on upcoming Blog Talk Radio shows!

  • Notes from today's show
  • Get ready for next week's guest, Stanley Fish, by reading How to Write a Sentence, available from the CC Bookstore. (Another great read on this subject is Our Mother Tongue).
  • Thomas Woods is the author of Rollback and Meltdown, among others. See the full list here.
  • Check out a list of other sound recordings and articles by Woods at the Mises Institute.
  • Visit the Ludwig von Mises Institute to find out more about his work in economics and check out all the available resources.
  • Purchase your own copy of today's prize, Whatever Happened to Penny Candy?, from the CC Bookstore.
  • To learn more about the student loan crisis, check out these articles: Another Debt Crisis is Brewing, This One in Student Loans (NYTimes), The $555,000 Student-Loan Burden (WSJournal), and Student Loans Leave Crushing Debt Burden (CSNBC).
  • Visit Woods' site at TomWoods.com to read free chapters of several books and find more articles, videos, and information.
  • Starting in September, look for Woods' online high school and college curriculum from a group of expert faculty on western civilization and U.S. history.
  • Check out the economic books by Richard Maybury and others available from CC: Economics in a Box, Bluestocking Guide to Economics, and Whatever Happened to Penny Candy?.
  • Read Walter Block's "A Future of Private Roads and Highways" from the Mises Institute. Also see his book The Privatization of Roads and Highways. Hear him talk about the book on YouTube.
  • "The Current Financial Crisis -- and After" by Kevin Dowd from the Mises Institute describes the fiscal crisis Woods describes.
  • Start reading about the philosophy of "agorism" via this Wikipedia article.
  • Read The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History by Woods and other Politically Incorrect guides from Regnery Publishing.
  • Thomas Woods on Leigh! at Lunch


    Dear Friends,

    This Wednesday, April 27 at 12 noon on Leigh! at Lunch, I'll be talking to New York Times bestselling author Thomas Woods.

    Click here to go directly to the show.

    thomas woodsThomas E. Woods, Jr., is a senior fellow of the Ludwig von Mises Institute. He holds a bachelor's degree in history from Harvard and his master's, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.



    His critically acclaimed 2004 book The Church Confronts Modernity was recently released in paperback by Columbia University Press. A collection of Woods' essays, called W obronie zdrowego rozsadku, was released exclusively in Polish in 2007. Woods' books have been translated into Italian, Spanish, Polish, French, German, Czech, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovak, Russian, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese.

    Join us at noon on Blog Talk Radio, and call or chat in with your questions!

    Book Sales and Savings

    Looking for that older-edition book you just can't seem to find? Wanting to add to your collection of great literature? Check out some of these upcoming events for reduced-price curriculum and books.

    Thurs., April 28-May 1, St. Louis, MO, Greater St. Louis Book Fair
    April 28-30, Winston-Salem, NC: Shepherd's Center Book Sale
    Fri., April 29, Alpharetta, GA: Homeschool Used Book/Curriculum Sale
    April 29-May 1, Greenville, SC, Greenville Friends of the Library Book Sale
    May 5-7, Burke, VA, King's Park Library Book Sale
    May 18-22, Centreville, VA, Friends of Centreville Library Book Sale
    July 15-17, Reading, PA, Book Bonanza 2011

    Don't miss the April and closeout sales at the CC Bookstore! Also, check out BookSaleFinder.com to find sales in your area!

    Monday, April 25, 2011

    What's Your Story?

    This week, the website Take Part featured an interview with three very different moms who have chosen to home school their children for a variety of reasons: When Parents Teach: Three Moms Talk Homeschooling. Take a look:
    Until recently, home schooling was considered a fringe phenomenon—something done by religious families seeking to oversee their children’s spiritual and moral education.

    But from hip urban communities in Brooklyn to small towns in the rural south, more and more parents are pulling their children out of public schools and assuming the role of full-time teacher...

    Why are so many parents opting for home schooling? And what’s it like to become your child’s teacher? TakePart spoke with three home-schooling moms to find out.
    (Read More...)

    Each of these moms has a unique story about her route to home schooling, and the journey on which it's taken her and her family. Well, guess what? So does each one of the thousands of moms and dads who participate in Classical Conversations - including you! Click here to read some of their stories.

    Have you told your story?

    Remember, each of our stories, and those of our family and friends, are part of a larger story. Not only that, but our experiences of joy, forgiveness, and grace echo back His story: His joy over us (Zephaniah 3:17); His mercy (Isaiah 30:18); and His gift of grace (Romans 5:7-8).

    So go ahead--tell your story, and echo in celebration as a family today!

    The folks at CC love to hear your stories. Post one on the CC Facebook page, leave a comment on this post, Tweet it (#ClassicalConversations or @CC_Bookstore), or send us an e-mail at TellUs@classicalconversations.com!

    Sunday, April 24, 2011

    The Door of the Sepulchre



    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Mag'dalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salo'me, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    And very early in the morning, the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun.

    And they said among themselves, Who shall roll us away the stone from the door of the sepulchre?

    And when they looked, they saw that the stone was rolled away: for it was very great.

    And entering into the sepulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted.

    And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him.

    But go your way, tell his disciples and Peter that he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him, as he said unto you.

    And they went out quickly, and fled from the sepulchre; for they trembled and were amazed: neither said they any thing to any man; for they were afraid.
    -Mark 16:1-8

    Friday, April 22, 2011

    From the Sixth Hour...

    Rubens, The Crucifixion
    And when the sixth hour was come, there was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour.

    And at the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, E'lo-i, E'lo-i, lama sabach'thani? which is, being interpreted, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? [Ps. 22.1]

    And some of them that stood by, when they heard it, said, Behold, he calleth Eli'jah.

    And one ran and filled a sponge full of vinegar, and put it on a reed, and gave him to drink, [Ps. 69.21] saying, Let alone; let us see whether Eli'jah will come to take him down.

    And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost.

    And the veil [Ex. 26.31-33] of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom.

    And when the centurion, which stood over against him, saw that he so cried out, and gave up the ghost, he said, Truly this man was the Son of God.

    -Mark 15: 33-39, KJV
    Readings on Easter

    Cal Thomas: Commentary
    R.C. Sproul: The Passion of Christ
    Peter J. Leithart: Tomb and Tomb

    Classic Easter Poetry

    John Updike: Seven Stanzas at Easter
    Edmund Spenser: Easter
    George Herbert: Easter Wings

    Wednesday, April 20, 2011

    FYI from Leigh! at Lunch 4/20/11

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 4/20/11, "Leigh at Lunch with Dr. Darrel Cox of Patrick Henry College" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive).

    Had a question for today's show that you didn't get to ask? Email it to 1smartmama@gmail.com or comment on this post for an answer!

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, April 27, at 12 noon EST to talk with Leigh and economic historian Tom Wood, author of Meltdown and Rollback.

  • Ongoing events

  • Register now for the first in the series "Toward the Quadrivium," with Leigh Bortins and Nancy Pearcey about science and teaching the quadrivium: April 29-30 in Manassas, Virginia.
  • Register now for our 1-day and 3-day summer Parent Practicums and Student Camps!
  • Register as a friend on BlogTalkRadio to be eligible for our weekly drawing! Click "follow" so you'll get updates about spontaneous and pre-recorded shows.
  • Send questions to Leigh for her next book on the dialectic via AskLeigh@ymail.com.
  • Email us at TellUs@classicalconversations.com to let us know what topics you'd like to see on upcoming Blog Talk Radio shows!

  • Notes from today's show
  • We recommend reading How to Write a Sentence by an upcoming guest on Leigh! at Lunch, Stanley Fish. (For more on this subject, see Our Mother Tongue).
  • Buy your own sets of Classical Acts and Facts science flash cards from the CC Bookstore.
  • Visit Patrick Henry College (phc.edu) to learn more about the school and its mission and vision.
  • Dr. Cox has also worked with Emmanuel College in Georgia and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. He has ties to Elim Bible Institute, Roberts Wesleyan College, Regent University, and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School at Trinity International University.
  • Read for yourself the Chalcedonian Creed, Athanasian Creed, and Nicene Creed to see early established doctrines of "mere Christianity."
  • Want to know more about the theological debates Dr. Cox mentioned? Click here to learn about philosophies of Complementarianism and Egalitarianism. Visit this site to find basic information about Arminianism and Calvinism.
  • Learn more about the Challenge program for upper high school students at ClassicalConversations.com.
  • As the main resource for high school students' biblical studies, Dr. Cox recommends the primary source--the Bible--with solid secondary sources only as support.
  • Monday, April 18, 2011

    Plans for Toward the Quadrivium

    On April 30, 2011 in northern Virginia, Classical Conversations is offering a one-day seminar in which we will consider how to move "Toward the Quadrivium" as we complete our understanding of the seven liberal arts.


    We have all asked and answered many questions about the Trivium. I find as the classical education movement, I, and my family mature, my questions must also mature. And so, I want to begin a new conversation as many of us move toward the Quadrivium. Answers about the Quadrivium will come too late for my own children's childhood education, as that is ending soon, but I believe the knowledge will arrive at the perfect time for their journey as life-long learners.

    Our ancestors tell us the Quadrivium is significant. I want to know how and why. How do I teach it? How will it help me be more human? What do I do with it? What is the Quadrivium?

    My current understanding is that it is the study of harmony or music, arithmetic or algebra, geometry, and astronomy. When do we study the Quadrivium? If you were an ancient Roman or Greek, you would have studied it before the Trivium of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. But since medieval times, it was studied after the Trivium. When should we as post-moderns study the Quadrivium? I think that the answer currently lacks consensus among those who think about it, and that is the main reason for this seminar: to engage in the dialectic as we work toward answers.

    A headmaster of a classical school told me the reason Classical Conversations is so successful. He said, "When Christians learn to think, they want to think with the Body. We are created for relationship and reconciliation." I don't want to think about the Quadrivium alone. I have all of you and your wealth of thoughts to guide me. I need to be influenced by the body of Christ. Since 1997, I've been asking you to talk with me about the Trivium. Now it is time to talk about the Quadrivium. So once again, I invite you to share in a classical conversation, a conversation new to me and many reading this blog, but old to the world. To be unable to study history and learn from it is to be always a child. I'd like to be able to grow up.

    So, here is the schedule for April 30. Should the conversation prove successful, I'd like to schedule additional conversations as we move Toward the Quadrivium.

    We have many special guests.

    First, Nancy Pearcey will speak on her book Total Truth, a book that is significant to our free summer Parent Practicums where 14,000 parents will spend 3 days in hundreds of locations across the country discussing the Trivium. We need to summarize what we've learned so far and establish the Christian context that embodies the seven liberal arts.

    Next, Nancy and I will have a conversation related to another of her books, The Soul of Science, which CC has used since 1998, and which was significant in developing the philosophies of Classical Conversations. I expect more classicalists will read this book over and over again as they gain a better understanding of the importance of the Quadrivium.

    Then, a panel of our students will talk with me about their experience as their families try to recover a classical education through the Trivium. We will discuss how the Trivium has prepared them for the Quadrivium.

    After lunch, Nancy will speak about the arts and her new book, Saving Leonardo. The heart hungers for beauty, and the seven liberal arts equip us to pursue excellence in all things. We live in a material world - a world of atoms and machines and processes. We need to honor the created world. We can do so by teaching our children how to imitate its magnificence.

    Next, Charles Carpenter will speak to us about the university accreditation process. He will give us an honest assessment of the goals of modern universities so that we will be informed as we develop expectations from advanced education for the classically educated student.

    When these folks are finished leading the conversation, I will end with some summary points and ideas on the direction we may want to take as we move Toward the Quadrivium.

    Remember, this is a classical conversation, not a monologue, so we will make time for questions and participation from the audience.

    I can't wait to hear your part of the conversation.

    Love, Leigh

    Darrel Cox on Leigh! at Lunch


    Dear Friends,

    This Wednesday, April 20 at 12 noon on Leigh! at Lunch, we'll be talking to Dr. Darrel Cox, professor of Biblical Studies at Patrick Henry College.

    Click here to go directly to the show.

    Before coming to Patrick Henry College, Dr. Cox was an Associate Professor of Bible and Theology at Emmanuel College in Franklin Springs, GA. He has served as Chairman and Associate Dean of a School of Christian Ministries and as a faculty liaison for new academic programs with SACS (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools). He teaches core and upper level courses in Biblical Studies and writes curriculum for online classes.

    Dr. Cox lives near Winchester, Virginia, with his wife and seven children.

    Join us Wednesday on BlogTalkRadio.com/1smartmama! Chat or call in with your questions for Dr. Cox, or send an email to 1smartmama@gmail.com before the show.

    Friday, April 15, 2011

    Teaching through Taxes

    Are you thinking about taxes this weekend? The real question is, are you thinking about taxes as a family of learners? What do I mean by that?

    I mean taking a few minutes of time to turn this (often unpleasant) experience into a conversation for the whole family about history, civics and government, or even activism. Here are some interesting tidbits to start you off:

    16th Amendment: The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

    In 1895, in the Supreme Court case of Pollock v Farmer's Loan and Trust (157 U.S. 429), the Court disallowed a federal tax on income from real property. The tax was designed to be an indirect tax, which would mean that states need not contribute portions of a whole relative to its census figures. The Court, however, ruled that the tax was a direct tax and subject to apportionment. This was the last in a series of conflicting court decisions dating back to the Civil War. Between 1895 and 1909, when the amendment was passed by Congress, the Court began to back down on its position, as it became clear not only to accountants but to everyone that the solvency of the nation was in jeopardy. In a series of cases, the definition of "direct tax" was modified, bent, twisted, and coaxed to allow more taxation efforts that approached an income tax.

    Finally, with the ratification of the 16th Amendment, any doubt was removed. The text of the Amendment makes it clear that though the categories of direct and indirect taxation still exist, any determination that income tax is a direct tax will be irrelevant, because taxes on incomes, from salary or from real estate, are explicitly to be treated as indirect. The Congress passed the Amendment on July 12, 1909, and it was ratified on February 3, 1913 (1,302 days). (Read more at USConstitution.net...)

    Visit this page from Justia to learn more about Supreme Court cases dealing with questions of taxation:
    By the terms of the Constitution, the power of Congress to levy taxes is subject to but one exception and two qualifications. Articles exported from any State may not be taxed at all. Direct taxes must be levied by the rule of apportionment and indirect taxes by the rule of uniformity. The Court has emphasized the sweeping character of this power by saying from time to time that it “reaches every subject,”519 that it is “exhaustive”520 or that it “embraces every conceivable power of taxation.”521 Despite these generalizations, the power has been at times substantially curtailed by judicial decision with respect to the subject matter of taxation, the manner in which taxes are imposed, and the objects for which they may be levied. (Read more...)
    The Internal Revenue Service is the government agency that oversees taxation. Visit their website to learn more about the agency's history, policies, and practices.
    The roots of IRS go back to the Civil War when President Lincoln and Congress, in 1862, created the position of commissioner of Internal Revenue and enacted an income tax to pay war expenses. The income tax was repealed 10 years later. Congress revived the income tax in 1894, but the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional the following year. (Read more...)
    Learn more about the "Tax Day Tea Parties" that swept the country a few years ago - try a Google search of "taxes" and "tea party" or visit TheTeaParty.net. Then make sure you know your history - check out the Boston Tea Party Historical Society to learn about the original historical event from which this movement takes its name:
    On Monday morning, the 29th of November, 1773, a handbill was posted all over Boston, containing the following words: "Friends! Brethren! Countrymen!--That worst of plagues, the detested tea, shipped for this port by the East India Company, is now arrived in the harbor. (Read more...)
    Whatever your approach to talking taxes in your family this weekend, don't miss the opportunity to ask the hard questions, wrestle with the big issues, and make this a teachable moment for yourself as well as your children. You can do it!

    Wednesday, April 13, 2011

    FYI from Leigh! at Lunch 4/13/11

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 4/13/11, "Leigh at Lunch with Bay Buchanan" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive).

    Had a question for today's show that you didn't get to ask? Email it to 1smartmama@gmail.com or comment on this post for an answer!

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, April 20, at 12 noon EST to talk with Leigh and Darrel Cox of Patrick Henry College.

  • Ongoing events

  • Don't forget to sign up for end-of-grade testing! Visit our new website, Homeschool Testing Services, to register and get test-prep materials.
  • Register now for our 1-day and 3-day summer Parent Practicums and Student Camps!
  • Register as a friend on BlogTalkRadio to be eligible for our weekly drawing! Click "follow" so you'll get updates about spontaneous and pre-recorded shows.
  • Send questions to Leigh for her next book on the dialectic via AskLeigh@ymail.com.
  • Email us at TellUs@classicalconversations.com to let us know what topics you'd like to see on upcoming Blog Talk Radio shows!

  • Notes from today's show
  • Register now for the first in the series "Toward the Quadrivium," with Leigh Bortins and Nancy Pearcey about science and teaching the quadrivium: April 29-30 in Manassas, Virginia.
  • Purchase your own copy of How to Read the Federalist Papers at the CC bookstore.
  • Longtime political figure Bay Buchanan is the president of The American Cause, an organization that promotes traditional American values. She is also the co-chair of the PAC Team America, and she writes regular columns for Human Events Online.
  • Check out Bay's first book, The Extreme Makeover of Hillary Rodham Clinton.
  • For examples of students who have made a name for themselves in the media, read about Lila Rose, a former home school debater, and Brett and Alex Harris.
  • Keep your eyes open for Bay's new book about raising children as a single mom (coming out for Mother's Day next year).
  • Monday, April 11, 2011

    Angela "Bay" Buchanan on Leigh! at Lunch


    Dear Friends,

    This Wednesday, April 13 at 12 noon on Leigh! at Lunch, I'm back, and I'm very excited to host Bay Buchanan, former U.S. Treasurer and long-time political analyst.

    Angela "Bay" Buchanan began her political career as the national Treasurer of Ronald Reagan's presidential campaigns in 1980 and 1984. This position catapulted her into a distinguished career beginning in 1981 when President Reagan appointed her to be Treasurer of the United States. At the age of 32, she was the youngest person to hold that position since it was established in 1775.

    Buchanan served as the campaign chairman for all three of her brother Pat Buchanan's presidential campaigns. In 2008 she served as a senior advisor to Mitt Romney. From September of 1996 through August of 1999, she co-anchored Equal Time, a political talk show initially on CNBC, then MSNBC. In addition, she worked as a political analyst for Good Morning America throughout the general election in 1992. From 1996 to 1997 Buchanan hosted a two-hour radio talk show program covering current events. In the summer of 1996, George magazine recognized her as one of the top 20 political women in the nation. The Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute named Bay Buchanan the 2007 Woman of the Year.

    Currently Buchanan is a political analyst often seen on CBS's Morning Show, as well as on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News. She writes a regular column for Human Events Online; is the president of The American Cause, an educational foundation dedicated to advancing traditional conservative issues; and co-chairman of Team America, a PAC dedicated to opposing amnesty for illegal aliens. Her first book, The Extreme Makeover of Hillary Rodham Clinton was published in 2007.

    A native of Washington, DC, Buchanan has a Masters degree in mathematics from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and has further studies at several universities, including the University of New South Wales in Australia. In 1981, she received an Honorary Doctor of Law Degree from Stanford University. She lives in Virginia and has three sons and two grandchildren.

    Please join us via chat, by phone, or by emailing your questions to 1smartmama@gmail.com.

    Wednesday, April 6, 2011

    FYI from Leigh! at Lunch 4/6/11

    If you are interested in topics that came up during this week's show, here are a few links and tips from Leigh at Lunch on Blog Talk Radio 4/6/11, "Leigh at Lunch with Nancy Pearcey" (Click on the title to listen to the show archive).

    Had a question for today's show that you didn't get to ask? Email it to 1smartmama@gmail.com or comment on this post for an answer!

    Coming soon from 1 Smart Mama
  • Tune in next Wednesday, April 13, at 12 noon EST to talk with Leigh and former U.S. treasurer and political analyst Angela "Bay" Buchanan.

  • Ongoing events

  • Don't forget to sign up for end-of-grade testing! Visit our new website, Homeschool Testing Services, to register and get test-prep materials.
  • Register now for our 1-day and 3-day summer Parent Practicums and Student Camps!
  • Register as a friend on BlogTalkRadio to be eligible for our weekly drawing! Click "follow" so you'll get updates about spontaneous and pre-recorded shows.
  • Send questions to Leigh for her next book on the dialectic via AskLeigh@ymail.com.
  • Email us at TellUs@classicalconversations.com to let us know what topics you'd like to see on upcoming Blog Talk Radio shows!

  • Notes from today's show
  • Register now for the first in the series "Toward the Quadrivium," with Leigh Bortins and Nancy Pearcey about science and teaching the quadrivium: April 29-30 in Manassas, Virginia.
  • Read Nancy's interview with Jennifer Courtney from the CC Writer's Circle.
  • Find out more about Nancy's work with The Pearcey Report and Rivendell Sanctuary. She's also worked with Human Events, the Discovery Institute, the World Journalism Institute, and Philadelphia Biblical University.
  • Read Nancy's books!: The Soul of Science, Total Truth, and Saving Leonardo: A Call to Resist the Secular Assault on Mind, Morals, and Meaning. She is also co-author of How Now Shall We Live?. She contributed the foreword to The Right Questions, and chapters to Of Pandas and People, Mere Creation, Pro-Life Feminism, Genetic Ethics, Signs of Intelligence, Reading God's World, Uncommon Dissent, and Darwin's Nemesis.
  • Read philosopher Richard Rorty's article presented before the United Nations, "Human Rights, Rationality, and Sentimentality."
  • Learn more about neo-Platonism from this article in Encyclopedia Brittanica. Read Total Truth to find out more about the influence of this system of thinking on medieval Christianity.
  • See for yourself the etymology of "religion" and "vocation" as developed by Martin Luther.
  • Francis Schaeffer is the founder of L'Abri Fellowship International centers around the world.
  • Check out these books from CC to help you integrate the arts into your children's education: The Gift of Music; The Annotated Mona Lisa; State of the Arts; Discovering Great Artists; Classical Music for Dummies; and Drawing with Children.
  • Take a look at the Fuller Seminary Center for Youth and Family to see research about the challenges of maintaining faith during the transition to college.
  • Tuesday, April 5, 2011

    Toward the Quadrivium

    Toward the Quadrivium
    A Classical Conversation with Nancy Pearcey and Leigh Bortins
    When
    Friday, April 29th
    6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Saturday, April 30th
    8:30am - 5:00pm
    Where
    Manassas Baptist Church
    8730 Sudley Road
    Manassas, VA 20110

    You are invited to the first of a series of events titled "Toward the Quadrivium", where author Leigh Bortins will partner with experts and talk about home-centered education and moving your children towards high school graduation. We are very pleased that author Nancy Pearcey is going to be our first guest and you should be too.

    Come join Nancy Pearcey and Leigh Bortins for a day of learning, Saturday, April 30th in Manassas, Virginia, located in Northern Virginia just a short drive from Maryland, Washington D.C, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and North Carolina. Discuss the importance of God's truth in education and how to apply that to your students' studies. Nancy will be speaking on her books Soul of Science, Total Truth and her latest, Saving Leonardo. Leigh Bortins will speak on how you can apply the great information from Nancy Pearcey's books to your child's curriculum, as you move them toward the Quadrivium.

    There will be a bookstore on hand, and a book signing after the event. This will be a great event for those who are interested in classical education or want inspiration for their homeschool.

    You can view a complete itinerary for the event here.

    Speakers

    Nancy Pearcey A homeschooling mother, Nancy Pearcey is the best-selling author of the just-published Saving Leonardo: A Call to Resist the Secular Assault on Mind, Morals, & Meaning. The book was hailed by Practical Homeschooling as "The Best Worldview Book EVER!" It was praised by homeschool leader Cathy Duffy as "a great read" and an "accessible presentation of the battle between worldviews." A former agnostic, Pearcey has spoken at Princeton, Stanford, Dartmouth, USC, and other leading universities across the nation, in addition to many Christian schools and colleges...(Read More)

    Leigh BortinsA nationally acclaimed educator, Leigh Bortins is perhaps best known for her ability to demystify the fundamental tools of learning. As a teacher, author and commentator, Leigh is credited with helping to launch the "home-centered learning" education movement. After earning a degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan, Leigh worked in the aerospace industry before beginning her work as an educator. In teaching study skills for almost 20 years to children and adults, she has written several books including...(Read More)

    Won't you join us? Learn more at TowardtheQuadrivium.com.

    Monday, April 4, 2011

    Nancy Pearcey on Leigh! at Lunch


    Dear Friends,

    This Wednesday, April 6 at 12 noon on Leigh! at Lunch, we're very excited to host Nancy Pearcey, the author of The Soul of Science, Saving Leonardo, and Total Truth, as we continue our conversation about faith and science.


    Nancy R. Pearcey, editor-at-large of The Pearcey Report, is joining the faculty at Rivendell Sanctuary and will begin leading classes in the Fall of 2011. She is also a columnist at Human Events and a fellow at the Discovery Institute. Previously she was the Francis A. Schaeffer Scholar at the World Journalism Institute, where she taught a worldview course based on her book Total Truth, winner of the 2005 ECPA Gold Medallion Award for best book on Christianity and Society.

    She has also served as professor of worldview studies at Philadelphia Biblical University, during which time she wrote her most recent book, Saving Leonardo: A Call to Resist the Secular Assault on Mind, Morals, and Meaning.

    Nancy has addressed staffers on Capitol Hill and at the White House; actors and screenwriters in Hollywood; scientists at labs such as Sandia and Los Alamos; students and faculty at Stanford, Dartmouth, Princeton, USC, Ohio State, and the University of Georgia; as well as educational and activist groups, including the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. She has appeared on NPR and C-SPAN.

    In addition to Saving Leonardo and Total Truth, Nancy is author of The Soul of Science and co-author of How Now Shall We Live? (with novelist Harold Fickett and former White House operative Charles W. Colson). She contributed the foreword to The Right Questions, and chapters to Of Pandas and People, Mere Creation, Pro-Life Feminism, Genetic Ethics, Signs of Intelligence, Reading God's World, Uncommon Dissent, and the Phillip Johnson festschrift Darwin's Nemesis.

    Nancy and Rick are homeschooling the second of their two sons.

    We're thrilled to have her on the show. Please call or chat in to join our conversation! Also, start thinking about Toward the Quadrivium: A Classical Conversation with Nancy Pearcey and Leigh Bortins! Early registration closes April 28.

    Friday, April 1, 2011

    • Home schooling's appeal spreads to mainstream
      (Reuters): "Studying at Harvard, meeting for group French lessons, volunteering at a hospital and spending a day in the wilderness are just a glimpse into a typical day of home schooling, which looks dramatically different today from just a mere decade ago..."
    • Greentree News is kids' homeschool project
      (Kearney): Read more about these three home school students' project creating their own newspaper. Why not make your own?
    • Liberal arts help provide a look into our humanity
      (Anchorage Daily News): "For it's in the liberal arts courses that the most fundamental aspects of the individual and society are addressed: love, justice, fairness, decency, wisdom. In another important commentary, 'The Core: Teaching Your Child the Foundations of Classical Education,' Leigh Bortins writes that students who have confronted these issues in liberal arts courses learn to make better decisions. Dr. Smatresk should probably read these books."
    • On the Art of Seeing
      (CiRCE): To have a truly aesthetic sensibility, sometimes we have to stop and re-learn how to look.
    • Public School Math Doesn't Teach Students How to Reason
      Interesting argument from mathematician Sanjoy Mahajan at the Freakonomics blog.